Tag Archives: Iraklis FC

A threat, some confidence and a couple of news

Yesterday I received the first threat targeting the author of this blog. Some far right supporter was angry with what I wrote about Mr. Voridis and Mr. Georgiades. I was threatened, among other things, that once the “revolution” takes place, my throat will be one of the first to be slit (if you wonder about the use of the word “revolution”, have in mind that Greek dictator Georgios Papadopoulos has famously characterized the imposition of the military junta as a “revolution”). Of course the post was not a result of my own research, the Greek blogosphere is full of this story (actually it’s even more detailed). I have merely translated and summarized what is written in Greek blogs and newspapers. Not that I feel like being apologetic for the post but it just strikes me how stupid and narrow-minded some people are. Unfortunately the threat was anonymous and thus I couldn’t reply to its author and it was written in Greek. I thought of translating it and posting it here but my limited translation skills are not enough to fully and rightfully translate the richness of Greek obscenity that was used. I was also embarrassed to translate the detailed knowledge that the commentator had about some of my female relatives’ genitalia.

Time for today’s news. Greece’s eyebrows are going to turn to the Parliament tonight for the vote of confidence of Lucas Papademos’ government. No surprises are expected though as the majority of the three parties that formed the national unity government will vote for it. Some MPs expressed concerns but overall I feel no suspense.

DEI trade unionists outside the Greek Ministry of Health

The Public Power Corporation’s (DEI) trade union, GENOP-DEI, has thrown another symbolic act today. Several trade unionists visited the Ministry of Health in downtown Athens and have cut the electricity supply. They said that the Ministry owes more than 141 million euros to DEI in unpaid electricity bills.

DEI trade unionists cutting the electricity supply at the Ministry of Health

If that looks strange for you, here’s the background. Last September the Greek government announced that the recently decided tax on property would be sent to the citizens through their electricity bills. In that way, paying your electricity and paying the property tax would be connected and if you would deny to pay the latter you would have your electricity supply cut off. That decision was taken despite Mr. Venizelos’ reassurances in June that they wouldn’t use the electricity bills for such a cause. Of course people were furious about it and DEI’s trade union, who were already under governmental and public pressure for a series of accusations and scandals, initially denied to print the bills in question. That rebellious announcement by the union leader Nikos Fotopoulos, which of course wasn’t implemented (I know a lot of people who received their electricity bill together with the new property tax), was followed by today’s show which aims to regain the people’s sympathy towards the trade union. If you want to find out more about the developments in DEI and the trade union’s reaction you can read this. Here’s a short video of today’s show.

Finally, 17 people have been identified for their participation in the events during the cancelled military parade for the Ohi Day, on 28 October. According to the Police, eleven of them come from the far left political spectrum, two from the far right and four have been identified as football fans (probably supporters of the delegated Iraklis F.C. team of Thessaloniki). They will be tried shortly.

Politicians! At ease!

An unprecedented thing took place today in Greece’s second biggest city, Thessaloniki. For the first time a military parade was cancelled. It was the military parade for the celebration of the 28th of October National Day (the so-called Ohi Day that signalled Greece’s resistance to the Axis in WW II). Hundreds of people gathered near the VIP stand, where the Head of State President Karolos Papoulias and the Minister of Defense Panos Beglitis were seated, and booed them. Among other slogans they were called as traitors, a political manifestation that becomes more and more popular in the past couple of years.

This is a short video of the moment when the Greek President decided to leave the VIP stand.

Moments before he departed from the VIP stand, Karolos Papoulias said “Who can call me a traitor? I fought the Nazis when I was 15 years old. I regret that they chose such a day to demonstrate. They should be ashamed”.

The group of protesters was composed by public employees, members of Syriza political party and other leftist groups, indignant Greeks and several fans of Iraklis FC (who have been protesting for weeks against the relegation of their team to the Fourth Division).

Some parts of the parade managed to walk through the gathered crowd but the military part of the parade was cancelled.

In Athens, the High School students’ parade was also a target of civil irritation. The City of Athens’ Brass Band paraded with black ribbon on their instruments whilst some students decided to turn their head opposite from the VIP stand when they were passing by it. The Mayor of Athens, Giorgos Kaminis, said that he will take disciplinary action against the members of the municipality’s band.

In the central Greek city of Trikala one man managed to evade the policemen, approached the local PASOK MP Christos Magoufis and punched him.

According to cretalive.gr, similar reactions took place in cities of the island of Crete. In the island’s capital, Heraklion, citizens threw eggs towards the VIP stand and the local MPs were escorted to the nearby building of the Prefecture.

Greece is one of the last countries in the European Union that is still holding military parades during its National Days of 25 March (Independence from the Ottoman Empire) and 28 October (Resistance against the Axis powers). Last year the Ministry of Defense has estimated the cost of such events. Here’s the analysis:

Cost of the 25th March parade: 840.000€
Cost of the 28th October parade: 430.000€