Tag Archives: Ethnos

Living in Greece at the end of November 2011

I just checked today’s newspapers and they had few exciting headlines. However, yesterday’s front pages would probably cause either panick or depression to a society somewhere in North Europe. As I stood there, watching all the post-apocalyptic headlines, I realized that in some years I will be saying that this is how it was to live in Greece at the end of November 2011.

Firstly, I will begin with the cover of this week’s Economist which has been reproduced, partly or as a whole, by several Greek newspapers.

Economist

“Eleftheri Ora” newspaper, which is a fringe paper that hardly sells a bit above 2.000 copies per day, has chosen to reproduce the whole Economist front page. Oh yes, with no reference at all. This paper is famous for its populist content, full of conspiracy theories, front pages of dead monks whose prophecies are now becoming reality, and so on. Actually I think that a daily translation of the paper’s front page could offer enough material for a separate blog. Anyway, when I think that usually it should be the last one in these posts of translated front pages due to its lower circulation. I only place it first here because of its relation to the Economist’s cover.

Eleftheri Ora

Title: The evil plan of the New World Order’s “Messiah”

Another newspaper which chose to use the euro meteor illustration is Dimokratia.

Dimokratia

Title: The Wehrmacht is approaching Europe

Overhead title: Everyone is talking about the coming financial Armageddon

“Ethnos” newspaper was the only one to reproduce the whole Economist front page, thus indirectly referring the source.

Ethnos

Title: A whole town is sleeping in the streets

Overhead title: Social shock – more than 20.000 homeless around Greece

Eleftherotypia and Kathimerini highlighted the continuing struggle of the Egyptians at Tahrir square.

Eleftherotypia

Title: The extra tax will be paid too by unemployed who worked even for one day (in 2011)

Picture’s caption title: Tahrir square does not succumb

Kathimerini

Title: Suffocation around the euro zone

Picture’s caption title: Egyptians overwhelm Tahrir square

Ta Nea

Title: Run Lucas Run! (a cartoon depicts Lucas Papademos in the body of Pheidippides, the first “marathon runner”)

Overhead title: A 100-day race for the government

Eleftheros Tipos

Title: Last chance for saving the euro

Overhead title: Germany leads euro zone off the cliff

Avriani

Title: Countdown for the euro

Greek operetta

When two of the biggest newspapers of a country publish the same title, there must be some truth in it. Here’s today round up of newspaper front pages from Greece. Enjoy the show.

Ta Nea

Title: Irodou Attikou (i.e. the Presidential residence street name) theatre: Operetta “The leaders, the gardener and poor Greece”

Eleftherotypia

Title: Operetta at the [President’s] mansion

Ethnos

Title: The selection of a PM with stature is the only way out

Vradini

Title: From saviours of the country… to destructors

Eleftheros Tipos

Title: The media and half of PASOK give an ultimatum for Papadimos

Adesmeftos Tipos

Title: Political shadow theatre

Estia

Title: Unnbelievable low comedy

Ohi

Today is a national holiday. It’s the so-called “Ohi day” (the day of “No”) which is what Greek dictator Ioannis Metaxas said to the Italian ambassador on the 28th October 1940 when he asked to let Italian troops occupy Greece. This was how Greece entered WW II and for many Greeks this day is a symbol of independence. It was a tragic irony that the EU deal about the Greek haircut came more or less on this day. And of course this couldn’t go unnoticed by Greek newspapers which, almost in their entirety, used metaphors joking about the proudly negative “Ohi” of the 1940s and the embarrassingly affirmative “Ne” (yes) of 2011. There has also been some war-related rhetoric while the most popular Ta Nea and Eleftherotypia newspapers maintained their pro-government stance by using boring “the haircut’s next day scenario” front pages which eventually didn’t let them make it to this post.

Eleftheros Typos

Title: They said YES to Merkel

Subtitle: Papandreou-Venizelos subordinated to the German attack

Dimokratia

Title: Defeat brings disaster

Subtitle: Greece returns to the Stone Age in a state of occupation

Ethnos

Title: What’s hidden behind the “YES” of 27 October

Aggelioforos

Title: The last chance

Avriani

Title: Banks surrendered to foreigners for a pittance

Subtitle: Greek people is strangled for the next 10 years – Public property is on sale

Estia

Title: Today’s supplement: the 28 October 1950 issue

Subtitle: Ten years after the historic “Ohi”

Supplement’s title: The fruits of “Ohi”

Printed on the day of the haircut

I always thought it was interesting to see and compare the newspaper front pages in a specific day of a great event. So here are a selection of what the most popular newspapers printed in their front pages on the day the Greek haircut was announced.

Eleftherotypia

Title: German tank brings a new Memorandum (a term by which the troika sponsored round of measures have been known)

Subtitle: The Merkel Doctrine: new measures and constant supervision

Vradini

Title: Haircut of national dignity

Subtitle: Greece under custody

Ethnos

Title: The great night of Brussels for banks and supervision

Aggelioforos

Title: Eurozone-Greece: carrot and stick

Eleftheros Tipos

Title: 50% haircut: night long battle between Merkel and the banks

Subtitle: The French and the Germans were deciding while Papandreou was watching

Dimokratia

Title: The government of Memoranda has exhausted all its tricks and is dragged to the ballot box; Elections on the 4th of December

Subtitle: Greece under foreign administration and with even more poverty

Avriani

Title: The Tsolakoglou government has accepted the permanent occupation by the troika

Subtitle: Treacherous submission of the Germans’ puppets

(Georgios Tsolakoglou was a Greek military officer who became the first Prime Minister of the Greek collaborationist government during the Axis Occupation in 1941-1942)

Because you’re on television, dummy!

Now here’s a news item that went largely under-reported in the international news last week. The Greek PM, George Papandreou, was handling a mini crisis. He was ahead of a hot week, a 48-hour general strike, the voting of the latest round of harsh measures at the Parliament and the preparation of the government for the meetings in Brussels last weekend. So he decided to meet the Head of State, President Karolos Papoulias, and then he planned to have separate meetings with the leaders of the political parties that form our Parliament. At some point between these institutionally legitimate meetings he decided to invite the chairmen of the nationwide tv and newspaper networks.

Now in which democratic country does a PM do such an openly Orwellian thing? And what could have been said in these meetings? No one knows. But the PM’s office never denied their occurrence. As Matina Papahristoudi wrote, “the PM has met the real bosses of the country; the Publishers”.

With the current situation of the media companies, most of which are on the verge of bankruptcy due to the decrease in private and more importantly public advertisement funds, the once super-powerful Greek media barons could not deny the PM’s invitation. Meetings were held with Stavros Psycharis and Fotis Bobolas (co-owners of MEGA TV and Publishers of To Vima, Ta Nea & Ethnos newspapers), Minos Kyriakou (owner of ANT1 television), Yiannis Alafouzos (owner of SKAI TV), Themis Alafouzos (Publisher of Kathimerini newspaper). As Matina Papahristoudi noted “we know what Mr. Papandreou asked from them. What we don’t know is what they asked in exchange”.