Tag Archives: ANT1

The airborne battalion of anarchists

This is how ANT1 TV reported the riots that took place in the Exarchia district of Athens on 6/12/14. The journalist, Yorgos Karaivaz, have surpassed Nobelist poets and imagined himself in one of the fiercest battlegrounds of human history. Enjoy the description and ponder the reasons why a nationwide TV station would go this low to describe in this way an otherwise pretty simple news story.

The age of Doom is coming

It has been approximately 2 years since the last time I posted something under the category The Daily Threat Show. I was writing back then about SYRIZA’s ghost:

It’s true that SYRIZA has been a bit confusing as to what exactly they are going to do if they were to form a government. The party, an until recently small leftist party composed of different fractions that tolerated different opinions within the Left, has seen several of its members announcing contradicting promises. Its ennemies, PASOK and New Democracy basically, have used this to their favor. They started a huge campaign to discredit SYRIZA by reminding us on a daily basis of what would happen if SYRIZA comes to power. The EU has followed suit and here we are now, having daily predictions of a post-apocalyptic, Armageddon-style Greece if SYRIZA wins the elections.

The daily threats have returned together with the elections for the European Parliament. The government has been trying to remind its citizens that the future is uncertain should they dare to for SYRIZA. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras has repeatedly warned us during the past 2 weeks about the instability that will haunt this country of SYRIZA wins the elections. The government’s vice chairman and coalition partner, Evangelos Venizelos, has even threatened that he will step down from the coalition [which would cause its collapse] if his party will not get enough votes. And then, let chaos reign this country.

So here’s a series of screenshots from the news bulletin of ANT1 TV and a rough translation of the super titles. Oh, by the way, these fearful messages are not dispersed throughout the week, they are all from the very same news bulletin. Imagine the horror one can feel after watching news like this. And, yes, imagine what he will vote tomorrow.

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Screenshot collage produced by Jungle Report

From top left to bottom right:

1. The overthrow that SYRIZA preaches could lead to prolonged instability.

2. A political “accident” (a reference to Samaras who has said that a SYRIZA victory would be a political “accident” for the country) by a loose vote (ie less cohesion for New Democracy voters who might want to vote SYRIZA out of protest) could bring catastrophe.

3. All those who want stability and not [national] elections should show it at the ballot box.

4. The discouragement of investors [by a potential SYRIZA victory] would drive the economy backwards and will cancel the people’s sacrifices.

5. The political instability could block all the beneficiary decisions for our country.

6. Tsipras’ goal to overthrow the government can be achieved if things stay as they are and the undecided voters will not vote for New Democracy or PASOK.

7. A loose vote could suffocate the domestic economy.

8. Currency fluidity and the discussion for a new haircut would freeze and the country will be again a month before going bankrupt.

9. The political instability will trigger centrifugal tendencies to many MPs.

 

Watering down Golden Dawn

Lots of friends and readers of this blog have been asking me to write something about the rise of the far-right in Greece. I repeatedly postponed such a post because I wanted to write something long, well-documented and details. But, hey, what can be said with several thousands words is now squeezed in a couple of seconds. Here they are. No further comment needed.

All political parties have condemned the attack. Golden Dawn issued a statement saying that Ilias Kasidiaris, who apart from an MP also happens to be the party’s press officer, was provoked by Liana Kanelli. Mr Kasidiaris was initially provoked when Rena Dourou of the radical left-wing Syriza party mentioned his alleged involvement in an armed robbery in 2007. His trial for this incident was supposed to take place yesterday but it was postponed for June 11.

The Athens prosecutor has ordered an arrest warrant against Kasidiaris but he is still at large. I wonder how he’ll appear in his pre-election campaign.

Nikos Mihaloliakos and Eleni Zaroulia (his wife, wearing a German cross ring) arrive at the Greek Parliament on their first day as MPs. The Parliament was dissolved within 48 hours to call for another round of elections.

Since their 7% in the last elections, I was always saying that their media gaffes would kill them. The biggest one was with their first press conference the evening of elections’ day. Until this one. Now the question is, will they ever manage to enter the Greek Parliament again?

Guy Fawkes forgot the Greek Parliament

Guy Fawkes, third from right

Remember, remember the Fifth of November,
The Gunpowder Treason and Plot,
I know of no reason
Why the Gunpowder Treason
Should ever be forgot.
 

Last night I had the privilege to attend the vote of confidence from the galleries of the Greek Parliament. I was hoping to tweet the details but, despite the Parliament Press Office’s reassurance, there was not wi-fi in the room and cellular networks were de-activated. Anyway, I must say that the theatrical play we all saw last night belongs as a genre to the theatre of the absurd. And it is indicative of how Greek society is functioning and also of how our collective memory is working.

This country is in its worst position for decades and, still, no one has been found responsible for it. No politician, no economist, no banker, no one. However this government was allowed to continue with its policies without the slightest moral problem. We just forgot, as citizens and as a society, to continue pressing for justice on this matter. It’s because we didn’t keep remembering long enough.

Similarly, yesterday everybody seemed to have forgotten how the past week has started. We have forgotten the irresponsibility of Papandreou calling a referendum that drove world markets and leaders crazy. We have forgotten that the question changed on Wednesday and the new question was dictated by the Merkozi couple. We have forgotten that yesterday, only a few hours before last night’s vote, Papandreou had almost resigned and then simply changed his mind. Last night he had the luxury to pose like a winner, because we didn’t keep remembering long enough.

And the result was that we saw 153 MPs voting a vote of confidence for a government that promised the absurd: to resign. Where on earth has such a thing happened before? In the previous days, several MPs have stated that they will vote NO if Papandreou wouldn’t promise to resign. So George arrived to the podium, at 23:00 and not at 20:00 as his office has leaked, and gave us the promise. The marginal majority voted YES. The socialist MPs, them and only them, have voted for their government to share the power (and blame) with the rest of the parties. The rest of the parties rejected the PM’s ideas with a negative vote but will be called today, or soon, to join the new national unity government. Papandreou won. He will resign. Apart from tragedy and chaos, paradox is also a Greek word.

We must finally understand that this government, together with the parties which will eventually co-operate to produce the next government of national unity, belong and represent the establishment which brought us here. This establishment cannot correct the situation, it cannot afford the metamorphosis. They are talking about the corruption, the clientelism, the debts, the wasting of public money as if they were phenomena from another planet. As a famous Greek blogger wrote, “Greece should not only be thrown out of the euro zone. Greece should be kicked out to another planet”.

Guy Fawkes, Guy Fawkes, t’was his intent
To blow up the King and Parli’ment.
Three-score barrels of powder below
To prove old England’s overthrow;
 

Papandreou also outlined all (his) policies that the new government of national unity will have to do. It’s our obligations toward the IMF/EU/ECB in order to continue receiving the bailout package’s installments. So not only he will resign, but his ghost will still haunt the next government. It will be a government committed not to the people’s verdict but to its predecessor’s policies. Speaking of inheritance, an emotional Papandreou said yesterday “From my grandfather, I inherited just a watch. From my father I inherited nothing but the name”. And the new government will inherit his policies.

By God’s providence he was catch’d
With a dark lantern and burning match.
Holla boys, Holla boys, let the bells ring.
Holloa boys, holloa boys, God save the King!
And what should we do with him? Burn him!
 

Epilogue. I respect Maria Houkli. She is one of the most serious persons in Greek tv today. She is the anchorwoman in ANT1 TV. When the marathon coverage of the political developments finished in the early hours of Saturday she came up with this farewell to the viewers:

“Goodnight and… what else can I say? Good luck to all of us.”

Because you’re on television, dummy!

Now here’s a news item that went largely under-reported in the international news last week. The Greek PM, George Papandreou, was handling a mini crisis. He was ahead of a hot week, a 48-hour general strike, the voting of the latest round of harsh measures at the Parliament and the preparation of the government for the meetings in Brussels last weekend. So he decided to meet the Head of State, President Karolos Papoulias, and then he planned to have separate meetings with the leaders of the political parties that form our Parliament. At some point between these institutionally legitimate meetings he decided to invite the chairmen of the nationwide tv and newspaper networks.

Now in which democratic country does a PM do such an openly Orwellian thing? And what could have been said in these meetings? No one knows. But the PM’s office never denied their occurrence. As Matina Papahristoudi wrote, “the PM has met the real bosses of the country; the Publishers”.

With the current situation of the media companies, most of which are on the verge of bankruptcy due to the decrease in private and more importantly public advertisement funds, the once super-powerful Greek media barons could not deny the PM’s invitation. Meetings were held with Stavros Psycharis and Fotis Bobolas (co-owners of MEGA TV and Publishers of To Vima, Ta Nea & Ethnos newspapers), Minos Kyriakou (owner of ANT1 television), Yiannis Alafouzos (owner of SKAI TV), Themis Alafouzos (Publisher of Kathimerini newspaper). As Matina Papahristoudi noted “we know what Mr. Papandreou asked from them. What we don’t know is what they asked in exchange”.