Daily Archives: 16/12/2011

On Loukanikos, the riot dog

A couple of days ago I’ve read that Loukanikos, Athens’ riot dog, was included among TIME’s Person of the Year feature story. Its central subject was “The Protester”.

Loukanikos posing for TIME Magazine

Loukanikos posing for TIME Magazine

Loukanikos with Patrick Witty and Peter Hapak after his portrait session for the TIME magazine.

Greece has a history in so-called “riot dogs“. There was Kanellos, now we have Loukanikos, who became internationaly known from a BBC video about the Greek protester’s front line dog. TIME Magazine’s website also hosts a collection of photos with Loukanikos’ appearances. Click here to see the gallery.

Thanks to modern technology, Loukanikos manages to become a sort of a pop idol. Videos in YouTube praising his braveness, blogs, facebook groups that want Loukanikos for Prime Minister, etc. Here’s an animation by Norwegian Flash-animator Bjørn-Magne Stuestøl (www.shagrat.net) in collaboration with David Rovics (from his “Big Red Sessions”-album -free for download at www.davidrovics.com– the song “Riot Dog” is David’s salute to this brave dog’s fight for justice in the economic turmoil that has hit Greece).

A high quality Flash edition of the animation can be seen here:
www.shagrat.net/riot.html

One of my favourite photos of Loukanikos had featured in a contest for Nikon.

Loukanikos “I am the Resistance”

The photo was taken by Aris Messinis (AFP/Getty Images) and can be seen in full here.

And here are some pop graphics of the canine resistance idol.

Loukanikos Che Guevara-style

Loukanikos Obama-style

If you’re interested in following Loukanikos’ activity, follow the Rebel Dog blog which posts photos sent from various people who have met the four-feet rebel.

Greek_riot_dog_by_Latuff2

Loukanikos drawn by Brazilian cartoonist Latuff in 2010.

Isn’t he adorable?

International press collage

Following the Information is Beautiful post, here’s another example of how you can creatively show the bigger picture. This is  a collage with front pages from the international press on the 4th of November (some days after George Papandreou’s announcement for a referendum and days before the appointment of the new national unity government). It was made and sent to me by street artist Absent.

International Press - front pages collage

Greece next economic model

Greece next economic model

From bleeps.gr

Information is Beautiful

The Myth of Sisyphus is a philosophical essay by Albert Camus. In it, Camus introduces his philosophy of the absurd: man’s futile search for meaning, unity and clarity in the face of an unintelligible world devoid of God and eternal truths or values. Does the realization of the absurd require suicide? Camus answers: “No. It requires revolt.” He then outlines several approaches to the absurd life. The final chapter compares the absurdity of man’s life with the situation of Sisyphus, a figure of Greek mythology who was condemned to repeat forever the same meaningless task of pushing a boulder up a mountain, only to see it roll down again. The essay concludes, “The struggle itself…is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

The Myth of Sisyphus from Wikipedia.

I’ve just bumped into a very creative contest which was organized by Guardian‘s Datablog and The Information is Beautiful Awards. Participants attempted to visualize aspects of the crisis in euro zone. I particularly observed in some of the projects the economic size and aesthetic influence of Greece. There were two main categories. The first was Design (for professional graphic designers).

Ready… Debt… Go! by Wayne Do Rego & Alex Seaton

The second one was Napkin (for amateurs). Anita Dembinsky used the myth of Sisyphus to show the possible vanity of the current solutions.

Is the Eurozone living the Sisyphus Myth? by Anita Dembinsky

Visit this page to see more of the entries and have an idea about how much better we could understand the economics of the crisis through such creative graphs.