Go Greek for a Week

The Greek crisis has finally become a reality… show.

I’m pasting below the description of a new tv show which will be hosted by UK tv network Channel 4.

Three British families try out the tax, pensions and work practices that caused Greece’s economic crisis and brought on the austerity measures aimed at cutting the deficit and qualifying for EU bailouts.

A 54-year-old British hairdresser discovers the generosity of the Greek pensions system, which still allows hairdressers, pastry chefs, radio continuity announcers and people in almost 600 other jobs to retire aged 53 at 90% of their final salary because their jobs are defined as hazardous.

A bus driver reaps the rewards of the Greek approach to state-run services, where bus drivers are paid double the national average salary and receive extra bonuses for arriving at work early and for checking bus tickets.

And a British surgeon is delighted to discover how paying income tax the Greek way will transform his disposable income.

The personal experiences of the three main characters are supported by expert interviews that establish the patterns of tax evasion, corruption and mismanagement that have helped to sink the Greek economy.

The show’s webpage is here. I’m so curious to watch the first episode (tonight at 8pm UK time) even if I am personally in Season 2 of the Greek crisis series.

7 responses to “Go Greek for a Week

  1. Can we(greeks) play in a reality show called ‘go something else for a lifetime’?I pick ‘go belgian for a lifetime’…

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  2. Belgium, my friend!

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  3. just a one-off character assassination of greek fiscal policy and society (which has some real flaws) but all in support of the banks.

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  4. “Go Greek for a week” humorously illustrated something that most of the world knows, the British seem to be an exception. The situation described in the programme is real, and obviously absurd and unsustainable, however, that is normality for most of the word, from Angola to Belarus, from Colombia to Djibouti, from Ecuador to Fiji and so on. The UK is an exception, with a few other countries such as Denmark, Norway, Sweden…
    The world is corrupt, people put up with it because they have no alternative. Italy turned corruption and bureaucracy to a fine art making the Greek look like amateurs. India, Pakistan, Russia invented incredibly convoluted ways of turning corruption and complicate procedures into a masterpiece of intricacy.
    It’s a centuries old system which will not be easy to eradicate, particularly because for a large majority of the world’s population that is the only way they know and they can’t even believe a fair system is possible.

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  5. Come on it is a propaganda it doesn’t contribute into anything !I am sorry UK is not perfect either thing of all the ones that cheat benefits why the company I work for in UK is registered in Channel Isles??(tax evasion guys)
    There are always 2 sides in every story and in Greece there are people who work and people who don’t !!!End of story! The world is not a perfect place!

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  6. The Greek system!! has always been a bit iffy to say the least!!! but Britain is far from perfect with people claiming benefits they are not entitled to, politician expenses scandal, offshore banking to avoid taxes, “donations” (Bribes in any other language) to local councils for planning permissions, cash in hand jobs the list goes on and on so let’s not get on our high horse!!!

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  7. GO BRITISH FOR A WEEK…..

    While the ship of the Old Continent is submerged in the swamp of economic downturn, it is hypocritical and stupid to see the genteel lords of the A Class laughing at the the rogue deck. It is a sad picture of a problematic society to chuckle over the problems of another society through TV trash, making a blind eye to their own mess.

    If people in Britain find it funny to “live a week like Greek”, through Channel 4’s new reality show, I’m sure no one would not want to take part in a similar TV program entitled «Go British for a week» .
    So let us imagine three Greek families participating in the reality and experiencing unemployment, losing their home and diving into alcoholism for a week, offering plenty of laughter to viewers.

    The first Greek family will live in British levels of poverty and their children will be amongst 600.000 children who are malnourished nowdays in the UK and have the opportunity to live as a hero of their childhood, Oliver Twist.

    The second family will enter the list of victims of alcoholism that is eating away the innards of the British society and will be within the25% of adult Britons consume alcohol at levels that endanger their health.

    As for the third family, the show will live the experience of living under bridges and at parks, with the company of thousands more homeless people seeking shelter even in the most unlikely parts of British cities.

    The game show will be based on the hard evidence that by 2013 approximately 3.1 million children, 2.5 million parents, 4 million adults without children and 2.1 million pensioners in the the UK will be living in absolute poverty. A term used in cases where the employee’s salary falls below 60% of median income.

    Yet according to a report published by the Information Centre of the British National Health Service (NHS), one in three men and one in six women consume alcohol both at risk of liver damage or occurrence of psychological problems like depression.

    Finally, Britain has one of the highest rates of homelessness in Europe is estimated that 4 in 1,000 people are homeless.

    «Go British for a week» and have fun …

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