Ohi

Today is a national holiday. It’s the so-called “Ohi day” (the day of “No”) which is what Greek dictator Ioannis Metaxas said to the Italian ambassador on the 28th October 1940 when he asked to let Italian troops occupy Greece. This was how Greece entered WW II and for many Greeks this day is a symbol of independence. It was a tragic irony that the EU deal about the Greek haircut came more or less on this day. And of course this couldn’t go unnoticed by Greek newspapers which, almost in their entirety, used metaphors joking about the proudly negative “Ohi” of the 1940s and the embarrassingly affirmative “Ne” (yes) of 2011. There has also been some war-related rhetoric while the most popular Ta Nea and Eleftherotypia newspapers maintained their pro-government stance by using boring “the haircut’s next day scenario” front pages which eventually didn’t let them make it to this post.

Eleftheros Typos

Title: They said YES to Merkel

Subtitle: Papandreou-Venizelos subordinated to the German attack

Dimokratia

Title: Defeat brings disaster

Subtitle: Greece returns to the Stone Age in a state of occupation

Ethnos

Title: What’s hidden behind the “YES” of 27 October

Aggelioforos

Title: The last chance

Avriani

Title: Banks surrendered to foreigners for a pittance

Subtitle: Greek people is strangled for the next 10 years – Public property is on sale

Estia

Title: Today’s supplement: the 28 October 1950 issue

Subtitle: Ten years after the historic “Ohi”

Supplement’s title: The fruits of “Ohi”

One response to “Ohi

  1. Pingback: Nein! Nein! Nein! | When the Crisis hit the Fan

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